Tuesday, July 29, 2014

TENDER JUICY PORK CHOPS EVERY TIME

TENDER, JUICY PORK CHOPS, (c) 2014
Modern pork is another casualty of fat phobia. Breeding pigs to be as lean as possible has made the meat pale, bland, and dry and to make matters worse, the layer of fat on the outside is trimmed to a meager quarter of an inch or less before it ever reaches the store. (When I complained to a rep from one of the major pork producers at a conference, she told me, "We are just giving people what they want.")

Brining the pork helps, but the real secret is not overcooking it. According to the most recent USDA guidelines, pork chops, roasts, and tenderloins can be safely cooked to medium-rare, followed by three minutes of resting time. The lower cooking temperature will produce pork that’s succulent and tender and will likely yield a finished product that is pinker in color than most of us are used to.

Restaurants have been following this standard for almost 15 years. The current temperature recommendation, announced in 2011, reflects advances in food safety and nutritional content for pork. Both the USDA and the National Pork Board suggest using a digital cooking thermometer to ensure an  accurate final temperature. Note: Ground pork, like all ground meat, should be cooked to 160ºF.

PORK CHOPS WITH MUSTARD SAUCE
You can use this basic method for plain chops, but the simple sauce adds a nice touch and I know you will like it.

Ingredients
For the brine:
3 cups cold water, divided
2 1/2 tablespoons salt (or 3 tablespoons kosher salt)
2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1/2 teaspoon freshly-ground black pepper
1 bay leaf

2 to 4 pork chops, center cut, bone-in, about 1-inch thick
Cooking fat or oil (such as lard, tallow, bacon fat, light olive oil)
1/2 teaspoon Herbes de Provence, optional
Salt
Pepper

For the sauce:
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup finely chopped shallots
1/2 cup chicken broth
4 tablespoons country-style Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons heavy cream
2 teaspoons lemon juice

Instructions
Brining adds flavor and keeps the chops juicy and tender. Bring 1 cup of the water to a boil, add the salt and flavorings, and stir until the salt is dissolved. Add 2 more cups of cold water to cool the brine down to room temperature. Place the pork chops in a shallow dish and pour the brine over top. The brine should cover the chops; add more water and salt (1 tablespoon salt per each cup of water), if necessary, until the chops are submerged. Cover the dish and refrigerate for 30 minutes or up to 4 hours; the longer time is better if you are not in a hurry.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Place an oven-safe (no plastic handles) skillet in the oven to preheat. A cast iron skillet is ideal.

While the oven heats, prepare the pork chops. Remove the chops from the brine and pat dry with paper towels. Rub both sides with oil or melted fat, sprinkle with herbs, if using, and salt and pepper. Set the chops aside to warm up until the oven is hot.

Remove the hot skillet from the oven and set it over medium-high heat on the stove top. Turn on a vent fan. Using tongs, lay the pork chops in the hot skillet. They should immediately start to sizzle. Sear, on one side only, until the chops are golden brown, about 3 minutes. If they start to smoke a lot, lower the heat a little. Turn the chops over and immediately transfer the skillet to the oven:

Roast until the pork chops are cooked through and register 140°F to 145°F in the thickest part of the meat with an instant-read thermometer. The temperature will rise a bit during the resting time. Cooking time will be 6 to 10 minutes depending on your oven, the thickness of the chops, how cold they were at the start of cooking, and how long they were brined. Check the chops after 6 minutes and continue to check every minute or 2 until cooked through. Do not overcook or the pork will be tough!

Transfer the cooked pork chops to a plate. Tent loosely with foil and let the chops rest for at least 5 minutes before serving. Pour off pan juices from skillet and reserve for making sauce.

Add butter and shallots to the hot skillet. Cook over moderate heat, stirring, until softened, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add reserved pan juices and broth. Cook and stir, scraping up brown bits from bottom of pan, for about 2 minutes. Add mustard and cream and bring to a simmer. Add lemon juice and simmer until slightly thickened, about 3 minutes more. Serve sauce with chops.

Serves 2 to 4
Nutrition data: Cal: 428; Fat: 26.6g; Protein: 41.9; Carbs: 2.2g; Fiber: 0.3g; Net Carbs: 1.9g

Sauce recipe adapted from www.Epicurious.com.

Pin It > http://www.pinterest.com/pin/224405993907982191/

More low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends

Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php  

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com



Friday, July 18, 2014

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH BACON, LEMON PEEL, CHILIES, AND OLIVES

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH BACON, LEMON, OLIVES, AND CHILIES, (c) 2014, JUDY BARNES BAKER
Cauliflower is a staple in the low-carb/high-fat community, where it is used to fill the void where the potatoes, rice, or pasta used to be. Here's proof that it can outshine its starchy counterparts. It doesn't have to imitate anything and it certainly doesn't need to be boring.

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH BACON, LEMON PEEL, CHILIES, AND OLIVES
Move over, ho-hum sides. Meet my new love!

Ingredients:
1 head cauliflower (about 2 pounds) cut into florets
5 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Coarse salt (use sparingly as other ingredients are salty)
Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Topping:
2 tablespoons butter
4 slices bacon, chopped, or 4 slices prosciutto, cut into fine strips
1 Preserved Lemon, skin only, well rinsed to remove salt, and cut into fine strips*
3 oil-cured Calabrian chilies, seeded and cut into thin strips, or ½ teaspoon dried red pepper flakes.
¼ cup quartered, pitted green olives
¼ cup quartered, pitted oil-cured, Kalamata olives

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Toss cauliflower with 3 tablespoons of the olive oil on a rimmed baking sheet. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast, stirring occasionally, until tender and golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes.

Meanwhile prepare topping.

Place remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a medium  saute pan. Add bacon or prosciutto and cook, stirring constantly, over medium heat until crisp. Drain and set aside.

Put butter in a medium saute pan over medium heat. When butter begins to brown, add the preserved lemon skin. Cook and stir until lemon begins to crisp.

Stir in the chili strips or flakes and olives. Allow to cook for about 20 seconds. Add bacon or prosciutto and heat through.

Transfer roasted cauliflower to a heated serving platter and top with bacon, lemon, chili, and olive mixture. Serve hot.

Serves 4 to 6
Nutrition data for each of 6 servings:
Cal: 255; Protein: 2.7g; Fat: 25.5g; Fiber: 2.5g; Carbs: 5.8g; Net Carbs: 3.3g

*NOTE: Preserved lemons can be purchased or made by my recipe. Another option is to use this shortcut from my friend and fellow IACP member, Carol Dearth. Carol is the owner of the Sizzle Works Cooking School in Bellevue, WA. See her directions, below, for a quick version of preserved lemons. It is part of a recipe for Roasted Cauliflower with Preserved Lemons on her blog.

Sizzle Work's Quick Preserved Lemons:
1 lemon
1 teaspoon salt

Cut lemon in half, lengthwise, then slice crosswise paper thin, discarding seeds and ends. Cut slices in half again. In a bowl, mix lemon with salt. Let stand 15 to 45 minutes. Rinse, drain, and store in refrigerator.

Pin It > http://www.pinterest.com/pin/224405993907923615/


For more low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends

Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php

“Nourished” in Print or Kindle (with a Bookmatch discount) > http://tinyurl.com/mq42koa


(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com

Saturday, July 12, 2014

NEW AND IMPROVED KALE CHIPS

BABY KALE CHIPS, (c) 2014, JUDY BARNES BAKER
My recipe for Kale Chips got mixed reviews. Even the ones I made myself varied from batch to batch; usually they were so good I couldn't stop eating them, but sometimes they were bitter. This is a sweeter version and much quicker and easier to make.

You can now buy baby kale leaves, which eliminates the need to strip out the tough veins and stems and chop the leaves into pieces. With baby kale, you just spread them out in a single layer and bake or dry them.

BABY KALE CHIPS
Enjoy a great tasting, crispy, salty snack and then tell your mama that you ate your greens!

6 ounces baby kale leaves
1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan cheese or to taste
Smoked finishing salt, optional

Rinse leaves and drain. Place in a salad spinner, if you have one, and spin until completely dry. You will need to drain the spinner and do it more than once. Alternately, place the leaves in a large kitchen towel, roll up the towel and sling it around while holding the ends tightly. (Or do it the boring way and just blot with paper towels until dry.)

Place the olive oil in a large bowl and mash the garlic into the oil. Add the kale and toss until well coated and glistening on both sides.

To bake: 
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Spread out in a single layer on two large baking sheets. Sprinkle with coarse salt and fresh pepper. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes or until chips are dry and crisp. Don't overcook or they will become bitter.

To dry: 
Use a dehydrator according to the directions that come with the appliance.

To finish:
Remove kale from oven or dehydrator and sprinkle with additional coarse salt or flavored finishing salt and grind more pepper over the chips. Grate Parmesan over the top and let cool. For a final touch, I sprinkled my chips with mango-smoked sea salt that my daughter brought me from Hawaii, but there are lots of specialty salts that you might try. Store in an air-tight container and they'll stay crisp for a few days. You can reheat them in the oven for a few minutes if necessary.

One ounce of fresh kale makes one serving of chips.
Calories: 35; Fat: 3.1g; Protein: 0.9g; Fiber: 0.4 g; Net Carbs: 0.9g

See more low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends

To buy Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php

To buy Nourished on Amazon > http://tinyurl.com/mq42koa


Disclaimer: I will receive a commission from the sales of the books above.

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com


Saturday, July 5, 2014

SUGAR-FREE SOFT DRINKS

MAKING SILLY DRINKS, (C) 2007, JUDY BARNES BAKER
I have always used the plain water button that is on most soft drink dispensers, but I never noticed the one marked "soda" until Dr. Eades mentioned on his blog (http://www.proteinpower.com) that he and his wife use it to get a sugar-free, carbonated beverage at restaurants. I took it a step further. Many restaurants provide lemon slices on the counter along with the straws and napkins, especially if tea is one of the choices, so now that I know the trick, I make my own "real" pop (similar to Sprite or Seven Up)  without aspartame or high-fructose corn syrup. I just squeeze a couple of lemon slices in a glass, muddle them a bit with a spoon, add a packet of sugar-free sweetener, which I always carry in my purse, and fill the glass with carbonated water. (You may still have to pay for a beverage, but it wouldn't hurt to ask if there is a charge for soda water.)

The picture above was featured in Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat, which came out in 2007 (the picture is from 2005). The cute little kids (still cute but not so little now) are my grandsons making "Silly Drinks." I still keep the ingredients on hand for making custom sugar-free pop and they occasionally want to make one of their old favorite combinations from their hand-written recipe cards still stashed behind the bottles on the counter or to whip up some totally new variation. Like typical teens they drink a lot of regular soft drinks, but at least they have a better option when they visit our house. 

Below is the original recipe from Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat. There are more brands of sugar-free, flavored syrups available today, made with a variety of different sweeteners, so you can choose the one you like. 

SILLY DRINKS
Have you ever had watermelon pop? DaVinci® makes dozens of interesting and exotic flavored syrups. Just use the proportions below and turn them all into no calorie, no-carb, and no-caffeine soft drinks.

2 ounces (4 tablespoons) sugar-free flavored syrup
8 ounces (1 cup) carbonated water

Stir together and serve over ice.
Makes 1 serving with zero calories and zero carbs.

Silly Drinks:
When my grandchildren come over they love to make “silly drinks.” I let them choose from my assortment of DaVinci® sugar-free syrups to concoct soft drinks using any combination of flavors and carbonated water. 

The grown-ups have to sample their creations such as banana-green apple-root beer or peanut butter-lemon-gingerbread pop. Of course, we always respond “Mmmm, good!—JBB, page 338 from Carb Wars

Note: To use sugar substitute and water instead of sugar-free syrups in recipes: For each tablespoon of syrup called for, use one tablespoon of water plus sugar substitute to equal 1 tablespoon of sugar. You may also add a few drops of flavor extract.



For more low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends

Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php


Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat > http://tinyurl.com/q95ga7j     

Nourished and Carb Wars from LC-Foods > http://www.holdthecarbs.com/books

Disclaimer: I have not received free samples of the product mentioned above. I will receive a commission on the sale of the books.

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com


Thursday, July 3, 2014

BABY BACK RIBS WITH MUSTARD VINEGAR BARBECUE SAUCE

SPARERIBS WITH MUSTARD VINEGAR BARBECUE SAUCE, (c) 2014, JUDY BARNES BAKER
One of my local stores had a fantastic Fourth of July special on Niman Ranch premium, pastured, baby back ribs ($4.00 off per pound!). I am (temporarily, I hope) allergic to tomatoes and peppers and a lot of other foods, so I was seeking a way to make a good barbecue sauce with lots of flavor and kick when I came up with this one. My husband loves this even better than my old version. I may never go back, even if I can.

BABY BACK RIBS WITH MUSTARD VINEGAR BARBECUE SAUCE
There is no tomato in this tangy, sweet/hot, South Carolina-style barbecue sauce. Vinegar based sauces are thinner and should be applied more frequently. The sauce recipe makes enough for several batches, but it will keep for a month or two in the fridge. Try it for chicken and fish as well as ribs. 

Sauce: 
1 cup apple cider vinegar
1 cup melted butter or olive, avocado, or other high heat oil
6 tablespoons Dijon mustard (Grey Poupon Coutry Dijon has no carbs)
2 tablespoons sugar-free maple syrup or sugar substitute of choice to equal 2 tablespoons sugar
4 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger root
½ teaspoon freshly-ground black pepper
¼ teaspoon ground allspice

Combine all ingredients in a bowl or shake together in a large jar. Cover tightly and store in the refrigerator. Sauce will keep for about 2 months.

Makes about 12 servings.
Per serving of 1/4 cup sauce: 
Calories: 74; Fat: 7.7g; Carbohydrate: 0.6g; Fiber: 0g, Protein: 0.1g; Net Carbohydrate: 0.6g

Ribs: 
Allow 1 pound of baby back pork ribs as purchased per person. Cut the racks into two-rib portions before roasting, if desired. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and rub with olive oil. Place in a roasting pan, concave side up; cover pan tightly with aluminum foil and bake at 325º F for 2 to 2 and ½ hours or until tender.

Remove the foil. Drain off the pan drippings. Brush the ribs with Mustard Vinegar Barbecue Sauce and continue to bake, uncovered, for 30 minutes, turning and basting with more sauce every 10 minutes or so. Brush with sauce again and serve hot. (1 cup of sauce should be enough for 4 pounds of ribs.)

Per Serving for pork only (yield from 1 pound uncooked weight including bones):
Calories: 890; Fat: 75.7g; Fiber: 0g; Protein: 50g; Carbohydrate: 0g

Notes: 
You may find several different names for pork ribs. Usually the ones labeled as “baby back ribs” come from the loin, and the name doesn’t refer to the age of the pig. This cut may, more accurately be labeled as “back loin ribs.”

Why doesn't pork taste as good as it used to? Modern pigs from factory farms, “the other white meat,” are much leaner than old fashioned porkers. Some producers, like Niman Ranch, raise hogs in open pastures without the use of antibiotics or growth hormones. Because the hogs live outdoors in the Midwest, they develop more fat for insulation from summer heat and winter cold, which promotes superior marbling, flavor, and tenderness.
~~
For more low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends

Buy Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php

Buy "Nourished; a Cookbook for Health, Weight Loss, and Metabolic Balance" on Amazon > http://tinyurl.com/mq42koa

Buy Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat on Amazon > http://tinyurl.com/q95ga7j 

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com



Sunday, June 22, 2014

SPICED PORK BELLY

PORK BELLY, (c) 2014, JUDY BARNES BAKER
If you had to eat just one food every day for the rest of your life, what would it be? That's not a hard choice for me. This is it. 

Ingredients:
1 (1 and 1/2 pound) pork belly, about half lean, with a thick layer of fat on top

Dry Rub:
1 tablespoon coarse salt
1 tablespoon ground fennel seed
1 tablespoon ground allspice
1 tablespoon ground black pepper

Braising Liquid:
1 medium onion (7 oz), chopped
1 large carrot (3 ½ oz), chopped
3 celery stalks, chopped
1 tablespoon good quality lard or tallow or high heat oil
3 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
1 cup dry white wine
1 (2-inch) piece of cinnamon stick
1 whole star anise
2 whole juniper berries
1 whole cardamom pod
1 whole clove
1 quart chicken or turkey stock

To Finish:
1 additional tablespoon of fat or oil for crisping pork

Preparation

Make Dry Rub: 
Mix seasoning ingredients thoroughly. Rub onto all sides of the pork belly and place in a nonreactive dish or pan. Sprinkle any remaining dry rub on top of the meat (use all of rub). Cover and refrigerate for 8 hours or overnight.

Heat oven to 325 degrees. Remove pork from refrigerator and place in a roasting pan.

Make Braising Liquid: 
In a large saucepan, saute onion, carrot, and celery in fat until soft, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook another 5 minutes. Add wine and cook until wine is evaporated. Add cinnamon stick, star anise, juniper berries, cardamom, clove, and chicken stock. Bring to a boil.

Cook and Finish:
Pour hot braising liquid over pork belly. Cover and place in oven. Cook 3 ½ hours or until completely tender when pierced with a fork. Note: The pork belly can be prepared up to this point and refrigerated in the cooking liquid until ready to proceed.

Remove the belly from the braising liquid and cool. Discard liquid or reserve for cooking vegetables to accompany pork belly (Brussels sprouts are nice). Heat oven to 400 degrees F. Cut belly into 4 portions. Place, fat-side-side-down, in a hot skillet with a a tablespoon of fat or oil and saute for 2 minutes. Return to oven to heat through, about 5 minutes. Finish warming in oven for 5 minutes.

Makes 4 servings.
Nutrition data: Calories: 881; Fat: 90.2g (42% monounsaturated. 32.9 saturated, 9.6 polyunsaturated); Protein: 15.9g; Carbs: 0; Fiber: 0
(Data includes only pork belly as other ingredients are not included in final dish.)

Recipe based on one by chef Donald Link of Cochon Restaurant in New Orleans, LA.

Note: If even after all the recent news stories, anyone is still nervous about eating fat, do yourself a favor and read The Big Fat Surprise; Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet, by Nina Teicholz and Rejoice!


For more low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends

Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php

“Nourished; a Cookbook for Health, Weight Loss, and Metabolic Balance” > http://tinyurl.com/mq42koa 

“Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat” > http://tinyurl.com/q95ga7j

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com




Tuesday, June 17, 2014

LOW-CARB MILK



I had a request from a reader for my low-carb milk recipe. It is featured in both Nourished and Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat.

Milk
Lactose, or milk sugar, tastes less sweet than other forms of sugar, but each 8-ounce serving of milk, including low-fat and non-fat milk, contains the equivalent of 3 teaspoonfuls of table sugar. By using the protein and cream components of real milk and replacing just the sugar, you can make your own delicious, low-carb milk.

2 tablespoons plain whey protein powder (2 net grams of carbohydrate or less per serving)*
3 tablespoons heavy cream
1 cup water
Sugar substitute equal to 1 tablespoon sugar
A few grains of salt

Stir the whey powder and salt into the cream and mix to form a paste. Add the water and sweetener and whisk until smooth or mix in a blender. Chill until very cold or add ice to the glass.

Makes 1 ( 8-ounce ) serving .
Per serving—Net carbohydrate: 1.8 g; Protein: 11.9 g; Fiber: 0 g; Fat: 17.6 g; Calories: 210
Total weight: 8 fluid ounces
Preparation time: 5 minutes active and total

*I like MRM brand whey powder.

Note:
If you use a sweetened vanilla whey protein powder, omit or reduce the sweetener.

Pin It > http://www.pinterest.com/pin/224405993907754422/

For more low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends

Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php 

Image: Glass of milk on tablecloth by Janine Chedid.
(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com

Friday, June 13, 2014

MEA CULPA FROM TIME MAGAZINE?

1984
2014
The March 26, 1984 cover of Time Magazine showed a frowny face made out of bacon and eggs. The headline of the feature article said, "Cholesterol, and Now the Bad News." Inside, an article titled, "Hold the Eggs and Butter," started with this line: "Cholesterol is proved deadly, and our diet may never be the same."

Amazingly, that original article from the 1984 issue (you can read it here) actually stated that the study on which this conclusion was based was not a diet study at all, but a study of a cholesterol reducing drug. The nine page article outlined the low-fat orthodoxy that has ruled the medical establishment for the last 30 years.

Basil Rifkind, the project director for the study cited in the '84 Time story, was quoted as saying he "believed" the research indicated that lowering cholesterol and fat in your diet would reduce your risk of heart disease. All the previous studies that the government had funded to try to "prove" the lipid hypothesis of heart disease had failed. We now know why; eating fat and cholesterol actually reduces the amount in the blood. Researchers have also found that the markers for inflammation are dramatically reduced on a low-carb diet with more fat. You can read about two recent studies on Pub Med here and here.

The writing is on the wall and the statin pushers are already looking for other ways to sell their wares to every man, woman, and child on the planet. How about as a cure for the common cold?

You can read "Ending the War on Fat," by Bryan Walsh from the June 12, 2014 Time Magazine here.

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com



Wednesday, June 4, 2014

BOOK SIGNING AT WOODINVILLE BARNES & NOBLE, SATURDAY AT 2:00 PM

Barnes & Noble18025 Garden Way N.E. Woodinville, WA
I'll be signing books at the Woodinville Barnes & Noble this Saturday, June 7, at 2:00 PM. Jennifer Kyrnin, Bruce Bretthauer, D.T. Sanders, Victor Thomas, and Rob Tiffany of the Woodinville Writers group will also be there.

Stop by and say hello if you are in the area. We'd love to see you!

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com

Friday, May 30, 2014

AN UPDATED CLASSIC: STUFFED CELERY STICKS

STUFFED VEGETABLE APPETIZERS, (c) 2012, JUDY BARNES BAKER
Stuffed Celery
Smear some cream cheese on a celery stick and you’ve got a quick, low-carb snack; make this delightfully retro stuffed celery and you’ve got an impressive hors d’oeuvre.

4 ounces soft goat cheese, crumbled
4 ounces (half an 8-ounce package) cream cheese, brought to room temperature
1 ounce (2 tablespoons) plain whole-milk yogurt, such as Greek Gods or Fage brand
½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/8 teaspoon hot sauce
Salt and pepper to taste
2 tablespoons purchased olive tapenade or roughly chopped black olives
2 tablespoons chopped Roasted Red Peppers (p.78 in Nourished) or purchased
1 bunch of celery
Dash of smoked paprika for olive-filled celery sticks
Minced fresh parsley for roasted-pepper filled sticks

Pureé goat cheese, cream cheese, yogurt, Worcestershire, and hot sauce in the bowl of a food processor and puree until smooth or mix by hand. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide cheese mixture in half. Stir tapenade or chopped olives into one half and roasted red peppers into other half. Set aside. Filling can be made ahead and softened to room temperature before using.

Peel celery with a vegetable parer to remove all the strings. Cut into 3- or 6-inch lengths. With a small spatula, fill each celery stalk with 1 to 2 tablespoons cheese mixture or pipe filling using a pastry tube with the star tip. Use olive filling for half the stalks and red pepper filling for the rest. Sprinkle half the appetizers with paprika and garnish half with snipped fresh parsley. Serve chilled.

VARIATIONS:
Stuffed Peppers, Cherry Tomatoes, and Other Vegetables
Use the same filling for tiny, fresh or pickled peppers or cherry tomatoes, split snow peas, or marinated artichoke bottoms to make a colorful party platter that will look like it was a lot more work than it was. 

Recipes from Nourished.

NOTE: Eliminate the goat cheese and use 8 ounces of cream cheese for a less expensive version.

Makes 18 servings of 1 six-inch-long or 2 three-inch long pieces each.
Per serving—Net carbohydrate: 1 gram; Protein: 1.9 grams; Fiber: 0.6 grams; Fat: 3.7 grams; Calories:50
Total weight: 1 pound 4½ ounces or 582 grams
Weight per serving: 1 ounce or 28½ grams
Preparation time: 25 minutes active and total

More low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends 

To purchase Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php

Buy Nourished (Print or Kindle) on Amazon > http://tinyurl.com/mq42koa

Buy Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat on Amazon > http://tinyurl.com/q95ga7j


Buy Nourished and Carb Wars from LC-Foods > http://www.holdthecarbs.com/books

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com 


Thursday, May 22, 2014

HOME FRIES AND FAUX POTATOES

HOME FRIES, (c) 2012, JUDY BARNES BAKER
HOME FRIES
This can be a lifesaver for a meat and potatoes man (or woman). 
Recipe from Nourished; a Cookbook for Health, Weight Loss, and Metabolic Balance.

4 slices bacon (3¼ ounce or 93 grams)
2½ cups (15½ ounces) Rutabaga Faux Potatoes (See following recipe.)
½ cup (2½ ounces) peeled and chopped onion
Salt and pepper to taste

Cook the bacon in a skillet until crisp. Chop and reserve. Pour off the fat from the pan. Measure 2 tablespoons of bacon fat and return to pan. Sauté  the cooked rutabaga, stirring occasionally, until browned. Add onion to the skillet with rutabaga and sauté until the onion is soft. Add the reserved bacon and the salt and pepper and cook until heated through.

“I appreciate the potato only as protection against famine, except for that, I know of nothing more eminently tasteless.”– Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, The Physiology of Taste, 1825

Makes 5 servings of ½ cup.
Per serving—Net carbohydrate: 7.8 g; Protein: 3.7 g; Fiber: 2 g; Fat: 2.9 g; Calories: 77
Total weight: 14 ounces or 398 grams
Weight per serving: 2¾ ounces or 78 grams
Preparation time: 5 minutes active; 20 total

Notes: RUTABAGA
Some sources list the carbohydrate count for rutabaga as being higher than that for turnips; some list them as being about the same. I prefer rutabaga as a potato substitute because it is a bit milder and the texture is more like potatoes, but rutabagas and turnips can be used interchangeably in most recipes.

Buy the smallest, freshest rutabagas you can find. Fresh ones will be heavy for their size and they will feel firm to the touch. Avoid ones that have been waxed to give them a longer shelf life; they may feel hard but the older they are, the stronger they will taste.

~~

RUTABAGA FAUX POTATOES (Basic Recipe)
Try this when you are missing those hash browns and home fries. They may not pass for russets, but they are very much like Yukon gold potatoes. Unless you tell them, your guests may be convinced that they are eating potatoes.

3 small rutabagas (about 1¼ pounds total)
2 walnuts in the shell
1 slice of lemon with peel, optional
Salt and pepper to taste
Sweetener, if needed

Peel the rutabaga and dice into ½- to 1-inch cubes. Simmer for 10 minutes in a generous amount of water to which you have added salt and pepper and the 2 whole walnuts. Change the water if desired, add the lemon, if using, and continue to cook for 10 to 15 minutes more or until fork tender. Drain well. Discard walnuts and lemon. Return the rutabaga to the pan on low heat and stir a minute or two longer to dry. Taste the rutabaga and if it is bitter, sprinkle with a small amount of sugar substitute. Use like potatoes in soups or chowders or to make faux potato salad or Home Fries. (See previous recipe.)

Notes: Adding walnuts in the shell to the cooking liquid will neutralize the odor of cooking cabbage; I have discovered that it also helps counteract the turnip or cabbage flavor of similar vegetables, like cauliflower and rutabaga. Lemon also helps to neutralize strong flavors. Changing the water once while boiling makes them even milder.

If the recipe you will be using calls for cream, rinse the rutabaga well after draining to remove any trace of the lemon so the cream won’t curdle.

“There is nothing so tragic on earth as the sight of a fat man eating a potato.”
– Vance Thompson, Eat and Grow Thin, 1914

Makes 5 servings of ½ cup each.
Per serving—Net carbohydrate: 6.5 g; Protein: 1.4 g; Fiber: 2.9 g; Fat: 0.2 g; Calories: 41
Total weight: 15½ ounces or 440 grams
Weight per serving: 3 ounces or 88 grams
Preparation time: 15 minutes active; 35 minutes total

Pin It > http://www.pinterest.com/pin/105764291224053620/
Buy Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php 
More low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends 
Buy Nourished; a Cookbook for Health, Weight Loss and Metabolic Balance”  > http://tinyurl.com/mq42koa  

Disclaimer: I will receive a commission from sales of the books above. 
(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com


Tuesday, May 20, 2014

OVEN FRIED CHICKEN

OVEN FRIED CHICKEN, (c) 2012, JUDY BARNES BAKER
The oven-fried chicken in Carb Wars; Sugar is the New Fat, always brought raves. People told me it was the best fried chicken they had ever eaten; juicy and tender on the inside with a crisp, brown crust that stayed on the chicken, not in the skillet. The addition of a little Parmesan makes this version from Nourished even better!

OVEN FRIED CHICKEN
Flour or bread crumbs can’t produce a crisp, brown crust that compares to this. 

3 pounds chicken parts (2 breast halves, 2 thighs, 2 drumsticks, 2 wings)
4 ounces of pork rinds (about 1½ cups of crumbled rinds)
¼ cup (1 ounce) Parmesan cheese, finely grated
Salt and pepper to taste
3 egg whites
¼ cup heavy cream
¼ cup high heat fat or oil, such as peanut oil. light olive oil, lard, tallow, or bacon fat
¼ cup butter*

Have ready a rack (for drying) and a large roasting pan. You may need a second pan to avoid crowding the chicken. For more uniform-sized pieces, cut each breast half crosswise into 2 pieces or have butcher cut it. Rinse chicken pieces and blot dry. Trim away any extra skin and fat. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and set aside. 

Process pork rinds in the bowl of a food processor until finely ground. Place pork rind crumbs on a dish; you will need about 1½ cups of processed crumbs. Stir in Parmesan. In a medium bowl, whisk egg whites until foamy. Whisk in the cream. Dip chicken in egg white and cream mixture and then roll in pork-rind mixture until evenly coated. Place on a rack to dry for 15 minutes.

Preheat oven to 425º F. Place the fat or oil and the butter in the roasting pan. Put the pan in the preheated oven until butter is melted, about 5 minutes. Place chicken in the pan, skin side down, and bake for 30 minutes. Turn the chicken and bake for an additional 30 minutes, or until well-browned and crisp. Serve hot or cold.

Servings: 5 servings of 2 pieces each.

Per serving—Net carbohydrate: 0.7 grams; Protein: 48.9 grams; Fiber: 0 grams; Fat: 57.9 grams; Calories: 727

Total weight: 2 pounds 7 ounces or 1108 grams Weight per serving of 2 pieces including bones: 7¾ ounces or 222 grams

NOTES:
* You can omit the butter and use a total of 1/2 cup of any oil or fat.

About ½ cup of the cream and egg white mixture and ½ cup of the pork rind and Parmesan mixture will be left over, so the carb count will actually be close to zero. Most of the fat will also stay in the pan, so the actual fat and calories will also be lower.

Recipe from Nourished; a Cookbook for Health, Weight Loss, and Metabolic Balance.

Pin It > http://www.pinterest.com/pin/105764291224045661/


More low-carb, gluten-free recipes > www.facebook.com/LowCarbingAmongFriends

To purchase Low-Carbing Among Friends cookbooks > www.amongfriends.us/JUDY.php

Disclaimer: I will receive a commission from sales of the books mentioned above.

(c) 2014, Judy Barnes Baker, www.carbwars.blogspot.com

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...